Curriculum

Preview the 2017-18 Course Catalog, including:
   • Diploma requirements
   • Course sequences
   • Course descriptions

 

 

 

 

 
 

JH Latin I

Students will learn the vocabulary, grammar, and culture covered by the first 18 chapters of Ecce Romani Book I. They will learn about the life of a typical patrician Roman family living in the first century of the Roman Empire. Language: Students will learn how to conjugate indicative verbs and decline 1st, 2nd, and 3rd declension nouns and adjectives. They will write simple sentences and answer comprehension questions about paragraphs and stories. By the end of the year, students should be able to recognize over 200 vocabulary words and phrases. Culture/History: Students will be able to discuss ancient Roman attire, households, entertainment, practices such as slavery, and features of the city of Rome. Mythology: Students will be able to match the Greek Olympians with their Roman counterparts. They will be able to tell the foundational stories of Rome and of its early heroes. Christianity: Students will pray the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail Mary, the Glory Be, and they will learn to sing several parts of the Mass.

JH Latin II

This is a continuation from JH Latin I, picking up at Chapter 19 of Ecce Romani Book I, and proceeding into Ecce Romani Book II.

JH Latin II

This is a continuation from JH Latin I, picking up at Chapter 19 of Ecce Romani Book I, and proceeding into Ecce Romani Book II.

English 7

This course focuses on a foundation of the understanding of the English Language. In this course, students are given the opportunity to develop and refine their writing and grammar skills in a workshop setting. Students will develop critical thinking skills through roundtable inquiry discussions and the development of argumentative essays. Educational Objectives: • Students are to produce writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout the written work, and provides a satisfying conclusion. • Students will demonstrate a comprehension and show evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational text. • Students will demonstrate understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

Accelerated English 7

This course focuses on a foundation of the understanding of the English Language. In this course, students are given the opportunity to develop and refine their writing and grammar skills in a workshop setting. Students will develop critical thinking skills through roundtable inquiry discussions and the development of argumentative essays. Students will use research and technology to support their writing. Educational Objectives: • Students are to produce writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and provides a satisfying conclusion. • Students will demonstrate a comprehension and show evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational text. • Students will demonstrate understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

English 8

This course focuses on writing skills and process. This course hopes to advance the students writing in a way that it demonstrates a more mature and complex analysis of readings across the curriculum. Students will learn to use research and analysis to strengthen their writing in almost every discipline. Students will use shared inquiry to delve deeper into literary texts. Educational Objectives: • Students are to produce writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout their writing, and provides a satisfying conclusion. • Students will demonstrate a comprehension and show evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational text. • Students will demonstrate understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

Accelerated English 8

This course focuses on writing skills and process. This course hopes to advance the students' writing to a more mature and complex analysis of readings across the curriculum. Students will learn to use research and analysis to strengthen their writing in almost every discipline. Students will use shared inquiry to delve deeper into literary texts. Students will consistently use the writing process to develop revise and edit their papers. Educational Objectives: • Students are to produce writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and provides a satisfying conclusion. • Students will demonstrate a comprehension and show evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational text. • Students will demonstrate understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

JH Spanish I

Introduces students to the basics of the language and grammar through use of the Supersite textbook website, online grammar tutorials, and communicative in-class activities. Topics covered include conjugation of verbs in the present and present progressive tenses, greetings, numbers, ser v. estar, direct object pronouns, and cultural information about Spain, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Students will also read various poems and song lyrics and watch the textbook fotonovela as part of the course. Students will also complete Day of the Dead, celebrity family tree, and papel picado projects.

JH Spanish II

Reviews and expands vocabulary and grammar introduced in JH SPN I. Continues use of the Supersite textbook website, online grammar tutorials, and communicative in-class activities. Topics covered include conjugation of verbs in the present and preterite tenses, reflexive verbs, double object pronouns, prepositions, superlatives, and cultural information about Cuba, Peru, Guatemala, and Chile. Students will read various poems and song lyrics and watch the textbook fotonovela as part of the course. Students will also complete Day of the Dead and huipil projects.

HS Spanish I

This introductory course is designed for high school students with little to no Spanish language background. This fast-paced course introduces students to all concepts covered in JH SPN I and JH SPN II. This course which will incorporate many components including use of the textbook Supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Students will also take the National Spanish Exam.

HS Spanish II

 

This blended course will review and expand upon vocabulary and grammar introduced in JH SPN II through the use of the textbook Supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Topics covered include preterite and imperfect tenses, por v. para, commands, the present tense subjunctive mood and cultural information about Costa Rica, Argentina, Panama, and Colombia. Students will read various poems and short literary selections and take the National Spanish Exam.

 

HS Spanish III

This course will review and expand upon vocabulary and grammar introduced in SPN I through the use of the textbook supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Topics covered include present and past tense subjunctive mood, commands, present and past perfect, future and future perfect, conditional and conditional perfect tenses and cultural information about Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua. Students will read various poems and short literary selections, watch several foreign language films, and take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish I

This introductory course is designed for high school students with little to no Spanish language background. This fast-paced course introduces students to all concepts covered in JH SPN I and JH SPN II. This will incorporate many components including use of the textbook supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Students will also take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish II

This course will review and expand upon vocabulary and grammar introduced in JH SPN II through the use of the textbook supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Topics covered include preterite and imperfect tenses, por v. para, commands, the present tense subjunctive mood, and cultural information about Costa Rica, Argentina, Panama, and Colombia. Students will read various poems and short literary selections and take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish III

This course will review and expand upon vocabulary and grammar introduced in SPN I through the use of the textbook supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Topics covered include present and past tense subjunctive mood, commands, present and past perfect, future and future perfect, conditional and conditional perfect tenses and cultural information about Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua. Students will read various poems and short literary selections, watch several foreign language films, and take the National Spanish Exam.

Spanish IV

This course will review and expand upon vocabulary and grammar introduced in SPN II through the use of the textbook supersite and online grammar tutorials, monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, voice recordings, chats with instructor and classmates on Wimba, and a Spanish Language Portfolio which will be submitted monthly. Topics covered include an overall review of tenses introduced in SPN II including, but not limited to, preterite and imperfect tenses, present and past tense subjunctive mood and perfect tenses. Students will also watch chapter themed short films, read multiple literary selections, host debates, study current event topics and take the National Spanish Exam.

AP Spanish
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.9 3.23 3.22 n/a

This blended face-to-face/online course will prepare students to take the AP Spanish Exam. Exam format, advanced grammatical structures, literature, and culture of various Spanish-speaking countries will be the focus of this course. Students will have monthly conversations with a language partner in a Spanish-speaking country, host debates, research and write current event articles, and complete various AP preparation exercises.

Greek I

Using Athenaze, 2nd Edition, Book I, students will work through Chapters 1-7. They will be introduced to the ancient Greek language, as well as the culture and mythology of the classical age (5th century BC) of Athens. Language: Students will learn the present tense, active and middle voice, of regular, epsilon-contract, and alpha-contract verbs, first, second and third declension nouns, adjective-noun agreement, and the rules governing Greek accents. By the end of the year, students will have mastered a vocabulary of about 220 words in ancient Greek. Culture: They will learn about the daily life of a typical 5th century BC Athenian farm family. Mythology: They will learn about the rise of the Olympian gods and goddesses and will read selected stories about each of the major deities. They will also begin reading in Greek stories from Homer’s Odyssey. Christianity: Students will memorize the Lord’s Prayer in the original Greek and will begin to read easy passages from St. Luke’s Gospel.

Greek II

Students will continue to work through Athenaze, 2nd Edition, Book I, Chapters 8-13. Language: Students will learn all three noun declensions, alpha-contract verbs, middle voice and deponent verbs, present participles, and the future tense. Culture/History: They will learn about ancient Greek religion and religious festivals, especially the Festival of Dionysus in Athens. They will learn about the history of Athens and the geographical features of Athens. Mythology: They will read episodes from Homer’s Odyssey and be introduced to the life and labors of Heracles. Christianity: Students will learn various liturgical prayers and will continue to read selections from St. Luke’s Gospel.

Greek III

Students will finish Athenaze, 2nd Edition, Book I, Chapters 14-16, and will begin Athenaze, 2nd Edition, Book II Chapters 18-19. Language: Students will learn the imperfect and aorist verb tenses, the passive voice, comparison of adjectives, and relative clauses. Culture/History: Students will learn about ancient Greek medicine, the rise of the Persian Empire, the Greek-Persian Wars of the early 5th century BC, and the rise of Athens as an imperial power. Mythology: Students will be introduced to important stories from the lives of Greek heroes (Theseus. Perseus, etc.). Christianity: Students will continue to read selections from St. Luke’s Gospel (e.g. the Sermon on the Mount, parables, the Nativity of Jesus).

Greek IV

Students will continue in Athenaze, 2nd Edition, Book II. They will complete Chapters 19-24. Language: Students will learn the passive voice in aorist and future tenses. They will learn the -μι verbs, the genitive absolute and the subjunctive mood. Culture/History: Students will learn about ancient Greek medicine and the healing sanctuaries of Aesclepius. They will learn of the importance of Mycenae in the Greek Bronze age. They will study the history of Athens through the 6th and fifth centuries up to the start of the Peloponnesian War. Christianity: Students will read sections from St. John's Gospel, including the Prologue, the Wedding Feast at Cana and the discourse with Nicodemus.

Pre-Algebra

In Pre-Algebra, students will begin developing the abstract reasoning required for studying algebra. This course explains in depth the concepts necessary for the operations of Pre-Algebra. This includes basic operations of the rational number system, expressions and equations in one variable, ratios and proportional relationships, inferences, geometry, and probability. Throughout this course, problem solving and real life applications are continually stressed.

Introduction to Algebra

In Introduction to Algebra, students will learn the foundations of problem solving, algebra, and geometry. Students will be introduced to the basic algebraic topics; this will include the study of: using rational numbers, exploring real numbers, graphing functions, and exploring polynomials. Students will also learn to use proportion and percent, apply proportional reasoning, be introduced to statistics and analyzing data, and will explore number patterns. Students will be introduced to the basic geometric topics of investigating patterns, using area and volume. Students will also investigate discrete math and probability.

Introduction to Catholicism

This course introduces students to the basic truths of the Church, with an emphasis on the story of salvation history and on the practical aspects of living our Catholic Faith. To prepare students for the Upper School curriculum, students commit selected scriptures to memory and learn to employ traditional theological nomenclature. As students explore the connections among theology, other disciplines, and current events, they discover sophisticated lines of inquiry that will be nurtured in the theology courses of the eighth through twelfth grades.

Holy Scripture

This course provides in-depth study of Sacred Scripture, the Word of God written down through the inspiration of the Holy Spirit and handed down through the generations to us today. Students examine the Books of the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, which make up the greater story of Creation, God’s saving plan for mankind, and how He prepares us properly to receive the salvific gift of his Son.  Through reading and writing-based exercises as well as participating in class discussions, group projects and presentations, students discover, explore, and identify what Christ’s teachings mean and learn to apply and articulate the Faith, particularly sourced in Sacred Scripture.

Life Science 7

Life Science encompasses who we are, what we are made of, how these components work together, and how living organisms interact with one another. The magic of God’s creation is all around us, and the better we understand it, the better we understand ourselves and our Creator. This course will explore the basic characteristics and necessities of life, the building blocks and processes that make life tick, and the whole organisms with which we share this Earth.

Accelerated Life Science 7

Life Science encompasses who we are, what we are made of, how these components work together, and how living organisms interact with one another. The magic of God’s creation is all around us, and the better we understand it, the better we understand ourselves and our Creator. This course will explore the basic characteristics and necessities of life, the building blocks and processes that make life tick, and the whole organisms with which we share this Earth. Accelerated sections cover the same topics but go further in depth and have more challenging assignments.

Physical Science 8

Physical Science encompasses everything we see (and do not see) in the universe. The magic of God’s creation is all around us, and the better we understand it, the better we understand ourselves and our Creator. Physical science is divided into two disciplines: physics and chemistry. This course will explore the concepts of matter and energy, motion, forces, and reactions.

Accelerated Physical Science 8

Physical Science encompasses everything we see (and do not see) in the universe. The magic of God’s creation is all around us, and the better we understand it, the better we understand ourselves and our Creator. Physical science is divided into two disciplines: physics and chemistry. This course will explore the concepts of matter and energy, motion, forces, and reactions. Accelerated sections cover the same topics but go further in depth and have more challenging assignments.

World Cultures 7

This course will introduce students to a number of non-Western civilizations. The four main regions taught over the course of the year will include the Middle East, Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. The class will cover the historical, religious, and cultural aspects of the people of these regions, and offer students a better understanding of their impact on the world. Students will also be given a basic geographic understanding of the regions in which these civilizations developed. Map exercises, movie clips, topical discussions, lectures, presentations, and weekly reading assignments will be employed to help the students better grasp the subject matter. The goal of this course is to present the history and cultures of non-Western peoples from pre-history to the modern day.

Accelerated World Cultures 7

This course will introduce students to a number of non-Western civilizations. The four main regions taught over the course of the year will include the Middle East, Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. The class will cover the historical, religious, and cultural aspects of the people of these regions, and offer students a better understanding of their impact on the world. Students will also be given a basic geographic understanding of the regions in which these civilizations developed. Map exercises, movie clips, topical discussions, lectures, presentations, and weekly reading assignments will be employed to help the students better grasp the subject matter. Students will be introduced to historical essay writing throughout the course. The goal of this course is to present the history and cultures of non-Western peoples from pre-history to the modern day.

World Geography 8

In this course, students will learn about how people and the environment interact in all the major continents of the world. Through this course students acquire the skills of geographic reasoning that is represented through the study of physical and human systems. Students will develop an accurate geographical locational awareness and will develop an understanding of the social, political, cultural, and socio-economic and environmental problems challenging the people living in those regions and localities.

Accelerated World Geography 8

In this course, students will learn about how people and the environment interact in all the major continents of the world. Through this course students acquire the skills of geographic reasoning that is represented through the study of physical and human systems. Using a variety of data sources of information, students will develop an accurate geographical locational awareness, and will develop an understanding of the social, political, cultural, and socio-economic and environmental problems challenging the people living in those regions and localities.

Fine Arts and Physical Education

Students will be introduced to various genres in Visual and Musical Arts. Students will take a semester of Visual Arts and a semester of Music. Arts classes will meet two days during the week's class rotation; students will participate in Physical Education during the other two days in the rotation.

Latin I

Using Ecce Romani, Book I, students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and culture by reading stories about a patrician Roman family of the first century of the Roman Empire.
Language: Students will learn all how to conjugate indicative verbs and decline
1st-4th class nouns. They will write simple sentences and answer comprehension questions about paragraphs and stories. By the end of the year, students should be able to recognize over 250 vocabulary words and phrases. Culture/History: Students will be able to discuss ancient Roman attire, households, entertainment, practices such as slavery, and features of the city of Rome. Mythology: Students will be able to match the Greek Olympians with their Roman counterparts. They will be able to tell the foundational stories of Rome and of its early heroes. Christianity: Students will pray the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail Mary, the Glory Be, and they will learn to sing several parts of the Mass.

Latin II

Using Ecce Romani, Books I and II, students will learn vocabulary grammar and culture by reading stories about a patrician Roman family of the first century of the Roman Empire. This includes their travels around Europe and daily lives in rural and urban settings. Language: Students will learn how to parse 1-4th conjugation verbs and recognize tense and mood. They will write complex sentences and answer comprehension questions about stories and grammar. By the end of the year, the students should be able to recognize 400 vocabulary words as well as important phrases. Culture/History: Students will be able to discuss the political developments of Rome. They will be familiar with inherited Greek traditions as well as become familiar with Roman expansion. They will recognize the names of key individuals and places in the Roman world. Mythology: Students will study the major Greek and Roman mythological stories as well as cover the heroic traditions and worship practices of the people of Rome. Christianity: Students will pray the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail Mary, the Glory Be, and continue to study several parts of the Mass.

Latin III

Continuing in Ecce Romani, Book II, students will learn vocabulary, grammar, and culture by reading stories about a patrician Roman family of the first century of the Roman Empire. This includes their travels around Europe and daily lives in rural and urban settings. Language: Students will learn how to parse all nouns and verbs as well as recognize tense, mood, clauses, and the varying functions of different cases. They will write complex sentences and answer comprehension questions about stories and grammar. By the end of the year, the students should be able to recognize 600 vocabulary words as well as important phrases. They should be comfortable reading and recognizing participles and the passive voice. Culture/History: Students will have a working knowledge of the history of ancient Rome up to the reign of Hadrian. This will include important political and military events with an expanded focus on Rome’s relationships to its neighbors in the Mediterranean. Mythology: Students will study the major Greek and Roman mythological stories as well as ceremonies of the ancient Romans. They will cover a wide range of Greek tales which influenced Roman beliefs and practices. Christianity: Students will pray the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail Mary, the Glory Be, and continue to study several parts of the Mass.

Latin IV

Using Ecce Romani, Book III, students will engage important primary texts from Rome’s Golden age, including works from Cicero, Caesar, Pliny, Plutarch and Eutropius. Language: Students will continue their studies of Latin grammar, especially with regard to subjunctive verbs, impersonal constructions, and gerunds, as they encounter them in the context of the authentic writings. They will continue to expand their Latin vocabulary and will create sophisticated translations of the texts they encounter. Culture/History: Students will study the transition from Republic to Empire in detail, paying special attention to the personalities that shaped that process. Mythology: Students will analyze the stories Romans enjoyed hearing with the goal of better understanding the people of ancient Rome. Christianity: Students will compare the culture and values of ancient Romans with those of the early Christians and will consider the ways Christianity made an impact on Roman life.

AP Latin
2013 Exam
Averages
Unavailable

Students will read all selections of Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar's Gallic War in Latin as specified by the College Board’s syllabus for AP Latin. Students will study and master the vocabulary, forms, syntax, translation skills, metrics, poetic figures, literary, social, political, and cultural knowledge necessary for careful understanding of AP Latin syllabus. Students will also read selections from Vergil's Aeneid and Caesar's Gallic War in English in order to put the Latin excerpts in a significant context in preparation for the freeresponse section of the exam. Collateral readings of literary critical, historical, social, and cultural perspectives on the core periods of the late Republic and the early Principate will be assigned regularly. Additionally, students will need to practice sight reading from Ovid, Catullus, Cicero, and Horace in preparation for the multiple-choice part of the exam.

Literature of the Western World

This course focuses upon classics of the Western World from Ancient Greece through contemporary times. The course integrates the study of literature and the practice of essay writing, both in and out of class, with further study of the writing process. Students will learn to develop their style while focusing on essay writing. Throughout the year, the students will be responsible for vocabulary development, outside reading, and standardized testing preparation.

Educational Objectives:
· To guide students to recognize the historical context of classical Western literature as well as its influence.
· To guide students to identity universal themes, symbolic patterns, social values within Western Literature. · To review and continue practice of the form, organization, and flow of the analytical and research essay.
 

American Literature

American Literature focuses upon classics of American literature from the colonial to the modern period. The course integrates the study of literature and the practice of essay writing, both in and out of class, with further study of the writing, revision, and editing process. Students will learn to develop their style while focusing on essay writing. Throughout the year, the students will be responsible for vocabulary development, outside reading, and two term papers examining the history of American Literature.

Educational Objectives:
· To guide students to recognize the historical context of American Literature as well as its influence.
· To guide students to identify universal themes, symbolic patterns, and social values within American Literature.
· To review and continue practice of the form, organization, and flow of the analytical and research essay.

British Literature

British Literature is a comprehensive survey of British literature in all its brilliant diversity. Students will read, study and analyze various plays, poems, and novels emanating from the United Kingdom. Students will begin to conduct sophisticated research culminating in an extensive, college-level research paper.

Educational Objectives:
· To guide students to recognize the historical context of British literature as well as its influence.
· To guide students to identify universal themes, symbolic patterns and social values within British Literature.
· To guide students to continue to review and practice the form, organization and flow of the analytical and research essay.

Short Stories

This course is designed to give students a more personalized experience with a specific topic in literature. In-depth reading and lively discussions in a small group allows students to see the connections between literature and their own world. Students will analyze cultural and social influences of short stories and create short stories of their own in this class.

Educational Objectives:
· To enable students to analyze and discuss literature in a small group environment.
· To have students gain experience in group discussions that involve in depth analysis. · To enable students to see connections between literature and their own lives and ideas.
 

Contemporary Literature

This course is designed to give students a more personalized experience within a specific genre of literature. In depth reading and lively discussions in a small group allows students to see the connections between literature and their own world. The Contemporary Literature seminar focuses on literature's influence on social topics.

Educational Objectives:
· To enable students to analyze and discuss literature in a small group environment.
· To have students gain experience in group discussions that involve in depth analysis. · To enable students to see connections between literature and society.
 

AP English Language
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.07 2.7 2.6 2.77

The AP English Language course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who can compose for a variety of purposes. Through their writing and reading in this course, students will become aware of the interactions between a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effective writing.

Educational Objectives:
· To guide students to define and recognize the techniques applied to non-fiction and rhetorical writings.
· To practice the form, organization, and flow of non-fiction and rhetorical writings.
· To prepare students for the AP English Language Exam.

AP English Literature
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.25 2.67 2.81 2.81

The AP English Literature course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students should consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

Educational Objectives:
· To guide students to read and analyze fiction writing at a college level.
· To have students gain experience in using literary critiques as sources in writing, as well as developing their own literary criticisms.
· To prepare students for the AP English Literature Exam.

Black and White Photography Lab I

Even in this digital age, a majority of colleges that offer photography majors have reverted to teaching film. They have discovered that their students lacked the fundamental knowledge of how the medium works from a technical perspective, and film is the only way to really learn this. This class will cover manual operation of a film camera, light metering, film processing, and printing. The class will involve 40% shooting and 60% Black and White darkroom work. The class will essentially be broken down into three sections: shooting, film processing, and printing. The school will loan the students cameras and light meters to use in class as well as provide photographic paper and chemicals. The students will gain knowledge in basic photographic math, physics, and chemistry. Achieving this knowledge will be fun and rewarding. We will take several photographic field trips during the course of the class.

Black and White Photography Lab II

In this class we will explore alternative methods in and techniques in black and white photography. This is an experimental class in which we will be shooting with a variety of cameras and film. We will be shooting with crude cameras that were originally designed in the former Soviet Union. We will experiment with inferred film, shoot with cameras that will be nothing more than a box with a small hole for a camera lens. The students will also experiment with 3 D printing. A variety of dark room printing techniques will be explored, including dodging and burning, forced processing, silhouetting, and soft focus effects. Each student will actually build their own cameras and produce images on photographic paper. We will take several photographic field trips during the course of the class.

Digital Photography I

In this course, students will gain an understanding of the history and tradition of photography and its place in the world. Class members will develop visual literacy by studying and viewing other photographers work as well as producing their own. The class will learn the basics of the important elements that create strong visual images. Students will learn the basic mechanics of how a digital camera actually works, not simply what buttons to push. The course will emphasize mastering manual controls on the digital camera and creative techniques. This is shooting class, not a computer or image manipulation class. This is a class on basic photography with an emphasis on photojournalism and editorial photography. It is recommended that the student have access to a 35 mm single lens reflex digital camera. A research paper and power point presentation contrasting two different photographers will also be required. We will take several photographic field trips during the course of the class.

Intro to Studio Art

This course serves as an introduction to studio art and the elements of art. It meets the basic arts requirement for graduation. It is the foundation course to all Fine Art classes at HSP. Content is covered in small unit based projects and a variety of media and technique will be explored.

Studio Art I

This course is for those who intend on continuing their studies in studio art. Elements discussed in the intro class will be explored further and intermediate drawing and painting techniques will be taught. Emphasis will be placed on composition, drawing rules, and major art movements from history. This class is required for those hoping to earn the Fine Arts Diploma in Studio Art.

Studio Art II

In this class, students explore more advanced techniques in oil painting, portraiture, monotype printing, and sculpture. The main focus of this course covers the chronology of art movements throughout history.

Studio Art III

This course focuses on the formation of concept and design. Projects are loosely structured and alternative processes are explored. Projects include: action painting, plaster carving, illustration and ink work. All assignments are assessed based on theme, concept and the ability to express ideas and social issues. The research portion of this class requires frequent gallery visits.

Studio Art IV

This class is a continuation of the concepts and techniques covered in both Studio II and III. Studio IV is a chance for students to develop an independent body of work. Students will be expected to complete a series of 6 specific assignments in the first semester of this course and will spend the second semester working on a self directed series of related pieces to be shown in an end of the year exhibition.

AP Studio Art
                                                     2D Design
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
4 3.25 3.33 3.34
Drawing
   
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.5 3.37 3.26 3.27

This is a portfolio class that is entirely structured by the students. Each student is required to complete a minimum of 24 art pieces over 2 semesters. This class requires summer work and weekly studio hours outside of class. This is not a course for the “leisure” artist; it is strongly recommended for those students wishing to pursue art after high school and who have the drive and responsibility to work independently.

AP Art History
2013 Exam
Averages
Unavailable

In this course, students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. The course emphasizes understanding how and why works of art function in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions, and effects of works of art.

Choral Music

In this course, students will prepare choral music for liturgies and other special events on behalf of the Holy Spirit school community. The class will help students develop skills in part singing, vocal technique, musical phrasing and interpretation, and breathing and posture. Repertoire will be drawn from the variety of musical styles appropriate to a liturgical setting.

Music Appreciation and Performance

This class will discuss various composers and musical works from 18th through 21st centuries. This class will also teach fundamental aspects of musical performance. Students will gain a deeper knowledge and appreciation for various styles of music. This class will include music rehearsals, lessons on how to listen to music, and performing various musical works throughout the semester.

Music Performance

Music Performance is for all students who seek to play in a classical mixed ensemble setting. Students with woodwind, brass, string, or percussion backgrounds are encouraged to join this class. Students with or without musical backgrounds are encouraged to sign up for this course. Students who seek to be musically active without taking Theory may sign up for Music Performance, as there is no prerequisite. This course will meet during the daily class rotation and will periodically have after-school rehearsals.

Acting 101

The purpose of Acting 101 is to introduce students to theater as an art form through the planning and production of scenes. During class time all students will participate in activities and exercises that develop acting and public speaking skills.

Advanced Acting

Advanced Acting offers an in depth approach to the study of dramatic performance. Students in this course hone their acting skills by exploring and expanding their imaginations through improv interaction and detailed scene work. In addition, students develop confidence in the areas of public presentation, creativity, and critical thinking.

History of Theatre

For the serious drama student, knowledge of the drama canon is necessary as well as introduction to more avant-garde pieces. These students will read and analyze scripts in chronological order, beginning with the Greeks and spanning into the 21st Century. They will be introduced to the process of examining plays with the production process in mind and provided the knowledge of what would be required to actually stage the piece.

Play Production

The purpose of the Play Production elective is to allow students to gain high level experience in theater as an art form through the planning and production of a full length play. During class time all students will participate in activities and exercises that explore aspects of the three key artistic skill areas of creating, performing, and producing a play. Additionally, each member of the class will serve in either an acting or stage management role to successfully plan and produce the play selected.

Theatre Arts I

The purpose of the Theatre Arts I elective is to introduce students to theater as an art form through the planning and production of scenes. During class time, all students will participate in activities and exercises that develop acting and public speaking skills.

Theatre Arts II

Elective expands on the principles and skills introduced in Theatre Arts II. At this point, the student begins to focus more either on the performance or the production side of theatre. Scene work more becomes more challenging and the staging more elaborate to match the student’s developing skills and knowledge base.

Classical Voice Training

The purpose of this course is to train the voice and deepen the students understanding of pitch, four-part harmony and vocal range. It includes the study of vocal techniques, ensemble singing, and basic music theory. Students will learn the fundamentals of music literacy, musicianship, and singing through the study and performance of quality choral literature from different styles and periods. A mandatory Christmas Concert will be performed at the end of the semester.

Musical Theatre Voice Training

This course is offered for students who are interested in Broadway style music. The class focuses on preparing the students for the Spring Musical Production. Each member of the class will serve in either an acting or stage management role to successfully plan and produce the musical selected. Music will vary with an offering from different genres, including light classical, pop and, of course, a Broadway musical. This class will also be run in a “rehearsal style format,” culminating in the participation in the actual show. Students must be prepared to participate to a greater or lesser extent in the production.

Music Theory I

Music Theory I is an introductory course that provides students with knowledge of the fundamental concepts of music theory. More specifically, this course seeks to teach students how to understand pre-existing music, as well as begin composing their own works. Basic foundations such as pitch, rhythm, scales, modes, melody, harmony, and transposition are covered within the curriculum. Students receive ample manuscript training, learning how to properly scribe notation. In addition to this, students also begin training on using Finale - the standard software choice used in scoring professional-level work.

Music Theory II

Music Theory II builds off of the foundation of Theory I. Students who take Theory II will be actively challenged by more difficult theoretical concepts and abstract harmonies. Understanding the workings and rules of counterpoint is paramount in this course. Students will learn how to build complex chords and phrasings, score four part ensemble works, understand and apply the use of secondary dominants, Neapolitan sixths, modulations, and more. The use of Finale will become more integrated with the course curriculum. With Finale, students will learn how to arrange piano pieces into full symphony orchestra instrumentation.

AP Music Theory

Students enrolled in AP Music Theory will be required to have a solid understanding of all concepts and methods that are taught in Music Theory I and II. Students will receive aural (ear) training, which teaches students how to hear pitch intonation, intervals, and dictation. Sight singing is also introduced in AP Theory, having students sing pitches back using solfège. In addition to aural training and solfège, students will learn musical forms and styles, and the specific characteristics of each. The AP Music Theory course has a rigorous curriculum that demands many hours of practice and patience from the student. This course is in congruence with the AP College Board and strives to amply prepare students to succeed on the College Board's administered exam.

Mandarin I

This course introduce students to Chinese language and the culture of Chinese-speaking people. Students will learn and practice Pinyin and four tones to get used to pronunciation and intonation of Mandarin. Students also learn basic strokes and Chinese characters. Major topics include: numbers, daily greetings, calendar dates and telling time, family and friends, school information and daily routines, foods and eating at restaurants. The cultural component of the course includes: position and main cities of China, Chinese Zodiac signs, popular Chinese songs, Mid-fall Festival and Chinese New Year (Spring Festival).

Mandarin II

Mandarin II emphasizes oral fluency and expects distinct growth in vocabulary and sentence patterns for functional use. Major topics include: expressing feelings; giving and following directions; weekday and weekend activities; color, size and shopping; modes of transportation; weather and seasons. Culture part covers: Minorities and Autonomous Regions; Confucius and Analects; Pure Brightness Festival; popular Chinese songs.

Algebra I

Introduces the basics of algebra including: algebraic expressions, graphs of linear equations and inequalities, solving linear, quadratic, and rational equations, systems of linear equations and inequalities, second degree polynomial functions, exponential functions, and properties of exponents. Instruction emphasizes fundamental skills as well as applications involving probability, geometry, and realworld problems. In addition, concepts introduced includes basic right triangle trigonometry.

Accelerated Algebra I

The course covers all topics included in Algebra I and includes an exploration of the structure of algebra, using the real number system and its properties. Topics include exploration with algebraic fractions, an introduction to irrational numbers, solving and graphing equations and inequalities, multiplying and factoring polynomials, solving systems of equations, and an introduction to functions, with emphasis on linear and quadratic functions.

Geometry

Covered in this course are the concepts of right triangle trigonometry, vectors, solving triangles, two-dimensional and threedimensional figures and their properties, logical reasoning and the development of formal proof using theorems and postulates, transformations, congruence, symmetry, and linear functions. The instruction emphasizes visualizing and understanding Euclidean geometric properties and mathematical relationships, making and verifying conjectures, and applying geometric concepts to real-world situations. Makes extensive connections between geometry and algebraic properties learned earlier. This course includes the use of geometry software to allow for discovery, investigation, and verification of geometric concepts and properties.

Accelerated Geometry

This course covers all of the topics in the Geometry course in greater depth and at a more abstract level. In addition, students are given the opportunity to explore non-Euclidean geometries and an introduction to circular trigonometry. Greater attention is given to making and verifying conjectures and using algebraic techniques to develop geometric concepts.

Algebra II

This course emphasizes facility with algebraic expressions and forms, powers and roots, and functions. Functions (linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) are studied both for their abstract properties as well as their usefulness as tools for modeling realistic situations. These functions are analyzed in their algebraic (symbolic) forms and their graphical representations. This course also includes an introduction to complex numbers, conic sections, and solving systems of equations using matrices. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Accelerated Algebra II

This course covers all of the topics in the Algebra II course in greater depth and at a more abstract level. The objectives covered in this course will clarify and extend the topics covered in Algebra I and II including an introduction of nonlinear systems of equations, probability and statistics, sequences and series, and analytical geometry and applications associated with matrices and conic sections. Students will be asked to combine and apply ideas, tools and reasoning from across their mathematical foundation to address a variety of questions. Working both from the “real world” and from purely mathematical settings, students will be asked not only to produce solutions but also to evaluate potential solutions. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Algebra III / Trigonometry

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II. This course will enhance the higher level thinking skills developed in Algebra II through a more in-depth study of those concepts and exploration of some pre-calculus concepts. Students will be challenged to increase their understanding and applied knowledge of algebraic, graphical and numerical methods to analyze, translate and solve quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Modeling real world situations and the appropriate use of technology are important elements of this course. Functions will be used to represent and analyze real world problems and mathematical situations. The course will also include a further study of trigonometric functions, right triangles, and oblique triangles.

Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry

This course furthers the study of the algebra, properties, graphs, and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and piecewise-defined functions. Trigonometric and circular functions are explored. This includes solving triangles, transformations on graphs of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, verifying and applying trigonometric identities, and solving trigonometric equations. Additional topics covered include parametric and polar functions, and vectors. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Calculus

This course is a study of calculus in one variable. The topics covered include: limits and continuity, differentiation of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse functions, graph and data analysis based on first and second derivative tests, study of mean and extreme value theorem, related rates, applications such as velocity and acceleration, integral calculus with applications, area under the curve, and net distance and volumes of solids of revolutions. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulative, and technology. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

Discrete Mathematics

Discrete Mathematics is a course that is designed to bring contemporary mathematical thinking to the non-specialist. Environmental and economic decisions dominate modern life, and behind these decisions are fundamental principles of science, technology, and mathematics. In this course, students will gain an awareness of these fundamental yet accessible principles as they spend time learning how the uses of mathematics can help them understand different parts of everyday life and the world itself. This course stresses the connections between contemporary mathematics and modern society, accommodating new ideas in mathematics, and their applications to our daily lives. Topics applicable to real world situations include: management sciences, statistics, voting and social choice, fairness and game theory, size and growth, and money and resources.

AP Statistics
2013 Exam
Averages
Unavailable

This year long study of statistical analysis is designed to prepare students for the AP Statistics exam. The course will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. This course will provide an excellent foundation in statistics applicable to any course of study in college involving the collection and analysis of data, including the physical sciences, biology, psychology, engineering, business, and political science.

AP Calculus AB
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
4.11 2.65 3.2 3.21

This course is a study of one dimensional calculus designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB exam. The course can be broadly broken into three major sections: limits and continuity, differential calculus, and integral calculus. Topics include those covered in calculus as well as volumes of known cross sections, separable differential equations, and slope fields. This course uses analytical, graphical, and numerical approaches to calculus. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized throughout the course. A graphing calculator is required.

AP Calculus BC
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
4.11 2.65 3.2 3.21

This course is a study of one dimensional calculus designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus BC exam. All of the topics covered in Calculus AB are covered in this course along with the additional topics of parametric, polar, and vector functions, improper integrals, series, and polynomial approximations. Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB rather than an enhancement; common topics require a similar depth of understanding. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized throughout the course. A graphing calculator is required.

Biology with Lab

The aim of this laboratory–based course is to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of biology. Students will investigate the science of life and life processes. This course will examine everything from the simple cell to the most complex organisms on Earth. Students will have many opportunities to actively participate in a variety of labs and activities that will enhance their understanding of biology.

Accelerated Biology with Lab

Accelerated Biology is intended for highly motivated students who wish to prepare for AP Biology. In addition to the course objectives covered in biology, students will independently design and implement inquiry based investigations, read and report on current research and topics in biology, and demonstrate a greater conceptual and in-depth understanding of the course material. The course will include additional units of study to prepare students for the Advanced Placement course.

Physical Science

Students will spend the first semester of Physical Science studying physics and will examine motion, optics, magnetism, thermodynamics, and waves. The second semester will focus on the chemical properties of matter. Students will have the opportunity to apply the physical science principles they learn to the physics behind how rockets work.

Chemistry with Lab

The aim of this laboratory-based course is to give students an understanding and appreciation of all aspects of chemistry and allow them to feel confident in the application of this knowledge. It is the instructor’s hope that students will become self-directed learners with highly developed critical thinking skills. This college preparatory course will enable students to have a smooth transition into any university system.

Accelerated Chemistry with Lab

The Accelerated Chemistry course moves at a faster pace and covers topics in greater depth than the regular Chemistry course. It is the ideal preparation for Advanced Placement Chemistry.

Physics

Physics explores the interrelationship between energy and matter. It is a science that seeks to explain the natural phenomena surrounding every aspect of our lives. Physics is the study of the physical world. Human theories are refined by comparing predictions to observations and experimental evidence. Physics is learned through measurement, experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving. Mathematics is therefore the language of Physics! The thinking skills students develop in this class will be applicable to all aspects of their education and life, and in essence, are more important than the Physics itself!

Accelerated Physics

Accelerated Physics explores the interrelationship between energy and matter. This course covers the same material as Physics, but also includes angular kinematics, fluids, thermodynamics, and an introduction to modern physics. Accelerated Physics is intended as a preparatory course for AP Physics. Human theories are refined by comparing predictions to observations and experimental evidence. Physics is learned through measurement, experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving. Mathematics is therefore the language of Physics! The thinking skills you develop in this class will be applicable to all aspects of your education and life, and in essence, are more important than the Physics itself!

AP Physics
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
4.2 2.7 2.89 2.94

Physics explores the interrelationship between energy and matter. It is a science that seeks to explain the natural phenomena surrounding every aspect of our lives. Physics is the study of the physical world and is learned through measurement, experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving. Mathematics is therefore the language of Physics! The thinking skills students develop in this class will be applicable to all aspects of their education and life, and in essence, are more important than the Physics itself! AP Physics B provides a systematic development of the main principles of physics, emphasizing problem solving and helping students develop a deep understanding of physics concepts. It is assumed that students are familiar with algebra and trigonometry. In most colleges, this is a one-year terminal course including a laboratory component and is not the usual preparation for more advanced physics and engineering courses. However, Physics B can provide a foundation in physics for students in the life sciences, premedicine, and some applied sciences, as well as other fields not directly related to science.

Church History

This course presents the principle beliefs of Catholics as outlined in the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds, and taught by the Popes and the Ecumenical Councils of the Church. Incorporating Apologetics, the science that aims to explain and justify religious doctrine, students study topics which include the major doctrinal issues and debates of the early Ecumenical Councils, the Reformation, and the Enlightenment, along with explanations of the significant historical and moral controversies of the Medieval and Renaissance eras. Further, through the Gospel account of Christ’s founding of the Church, the Acts of the Apostles, and the two millennia of Church history to date, students see the guidance of the Holy Spirit at work, the institutional continuity provided by Apostolic Succession, and the consistency of Catholic faith and morals.

Sacramental Theology

This course explores the incarnational characteristic of the Sacraments and the Catholic faith, and offers an explanation of sacramental theology. In Jesus Christ, God became physically visible, touchable, and knowable. By the seven sacraments, Catholics continue to encounter Jesus Christ through the sensible. Our faith manifests not merely in the spiritual sense but physically. Thus, along with the sacraments, students study Theology of the Body, a series of teachings by Pope John Paul II concerning human sexuality, to explore how we are created in the image and likeness of God, how in the right relationship men and women best reflect the Holy Trinity, and consider closely the call to marriage, the consecrated life, and religious vocations. Moreover, preparation for the Sacrament of Confirmation for Catholic students reinforces and brings to life class topics.

Moral Theology

This course covers matters of morals in the Faith, focusing briefly on the Ten Commandments and their fulfillment in Christ and the New Law of Grace and the Beatitudes, and more fully through reading Dante, whose voyage through Hell and Purgatory offer insights into sin, humanity, suffering and redemption in one of the greatest works of literature, The Divine Comedy. Second semester emphasizes the ethical life as lived out in relationships with others, or Social Ethics. The Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Church reads: “The laity are called in a special way to make the Church present and operative in those places and circumstances where only through them can she become the salt of the earth.” The charge to laity manifests in the emphasis placed on the sanctity of life and the challenge to students to witness to that sanctity amidst a growing culture of death. Pope John Paul the Great's The Gospel of Life provides an inspired message worth evangelizing.

Philosophy

With the assistance of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas, the purpose of this class in large part is to form a foundation and working understanding of philosophy. Students begin with the general nature of philosophy in Aristotle’s categories and causes, and proceed through the basics of metaphysics, epistemology and language as the Angelic Doctor would have us understand them. Once armed with the tools of philosophical discourse, students use excerpts from the great works to comprehend the challenges we face in seeing reality rightly. Students analyze the Christian idea of man, and delve the critical issues that stand between the modern human mind and the true, good, and beautiful in technology, education, art, and ideology. Finally, by the development of an understanding of ethics, the class will examine the virtues and consider how when properly understood their cultivation leads to happiness and the good life. The class will culminate with a written guide on How to Live the Good Life, with contributions from each student and including the topics of the year, the Beatitudes, and the beatific vision.

Western Civilization

Modern Western Civilization examines the political, social, religious, economic, and cultural development of Western nations. Major topics include the rise of nation-states, the Age of Exploration, the Age of Revolution and Reaction, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Imperialism and the world wars.

U.S. History

United States History examines our nation’s history from the discovery of the new world to the modern era. This course provides students with a topical understanding of the evolution of the nation’s social and economic history as well as a history of the nation’s involvement in foreign affairs. Major topics/areas include the colonial period, the establishment of the constitutional government, the federalist era, the age of Jackson, the Civil War and Reconstruction, big business and progressivism, the Great Depression, World Wars, Civil Rights, and the Cold War.

U.S. Government

U.S. Government provides students with an understanding of the structures and functions of the federal government. Students will explore the principles of government established by the Constitution and will examine the ways those principles are enacted by the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government.

Economics

This one semester of economics will provide students with an introduction to macro-economics. Topics will include the basic economic concepts, the measurement of economic performance of a nation, the financial sector, employment, inflation and the critical factors responsible for the U.S, and world economic growth or recession.

AP European History
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.17 3.06 2.78 2.78

Advanced Placement European History is a college level survey course of European history from the Renaissance to the modern era. This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of Europe’s social and economic history as well as the political, intellectual, and cultural innovations of the continent’s past 700 years. Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation, the religious wars of the 16th and 17th centuries, the Enlightenment, revolutions and reform movements of the 18th and 19th centuries and the birth of modern Europe. As this is a college level course, students must be self-motivated and self-directed learners who are willing to commit to completing substantial research, reading, and writing outside of the classroom environment. At the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP World History

The AP World History course content is structured around the investigation of five course themes and nineteen key concepts in six different chronological periods, from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course develops students’ capacity and ability to think and reason in a deeper, more systematic way, better preparing them for subsequent college courses. The four major methods of teaching and learning include: crafting historical arguments from historical evidence, chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization as well as historical interpretation and synthesis. Five course themes of historical inquiry will be investigated at various points throughout the course and revisited as manifested in particular historical developments over time. The course will prepare students to answer free response questions (FRQ’s) and document based questions (DBQ’s) which are required in AP World, AP European and AP United States history courses.

AP Comparative Government

The AP Comparative Government and Politics course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course focuses on the study of the governments of the following nations: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. In comparing the governments of these nations, the course illustrates the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, explains differences in processes and policy outcomes, and communicates to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: understand major comparative political concepts, themes, and generalizations, understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences, be able to compare and contrast political institutions and processes across countries and to derive generalizations, and be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to comparative government and politics.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics is the study of the political process, the study of the structure and functions of the federal government as well as the study of the groups which influence and affect the policy making process. As this is a college level course, students must be self-motivated, self-directed learners who are willing to complete substantial research, reading and writing outside of the classroom environment. At the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP Macroeconomics
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.33 2.77 2.75 2.8

The Macroeconomics course is an AP class designed to provide students with a thorough comprehension of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The topics covered include the basic economic concepts, the measurement of economic performance of a nation, national income and price determination, the financial sector, employment, inflation and the critical factors responsible for the US and world economic growth or recession. The course is taught using the enquiry approach, which means that students will learn the theories and principles and learn how to apply them to problems. Through this process students will be better placed to understand the fundamental economic concepts and theories applicable to the free market and planned economic systems.

AP United States History
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.9 2.75 2.9 n/a

Advanced Placement United States History is a college level survey course which examines our nation’s history from discovery of the new world to the modern era. This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of the nation’s social and economic history as well as a history of the nation’s involvement in foreign affairs. Major topics areas include the colonial period, the establishment of the constitutional government, the federalist era, the age of Jackson, the Civil War and Reconstruction, industrialization and urbanization, imperialism, the World Wars, and the modern era. As this is a college level course, students must be self-motivated, self-directed learners who are willing to commit to completing substantial research, reading and writing outside of the classroom environment. At the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam.

World History

This course will offer a general overview of the major periods of history from the earliest of times. Mixed in throughout the course will be lessons on politics, law, religion, and minority struggles throughout the world. Debates, topical discussions, lectures, presentations, writing assignments, and weekly reading homework will be used to facilitate student learning. Students will learn how to write expository essays throughout the course to prepare them for the next levels of Social Studies courses at Holy Spirit Preparatory School. The goal of this course is to present the history of the world starting with the ancient Middle East and ending with the Middle Ages.

Accelerated World History

This course will offer a general overview of the major periods of history from the earliest of times. Mixed in throughout the course will be lessons on politics, law, religion, and minority struggles throughout the world. Whenever possible, primary documents and point of view analysis will be incorporated to increase the students’ understanding of the material. In addition, movie clips, as well as debates, topical discussions, lectures, presentations, writing assignments, and weekly reading homework will be used to aid the student in understanding the material. Students will learn how to write expository essays throughout the course with emphasis on document based and free response questions to prepare them for the advanced placement courses at Holy Spirit Preparatory School. The goal of this course is to present the history of the world starting with the ancient Middle East and ending with the Middle Ages.

Biology with Lab

The aim of this laboratory–based course is to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of biology. Students will investigate the science of life and life processes. This course will examine everything from the simple cell to the most complex organisms on Earth. Students will have many opportunities to actively participate in a variety of labs and activities that will enhance their understanding of biology.

Accelerated Biology with Lab

Accelerated Biology is intended for highly motivated students who wish to prepare for AP Biology. In addition to the course objectives covered in biology, students will independently design and implement inquiry based investigations, read and report on current research and topics in biology, and demonstrate a greater conceptual and in-depth understanding of the course material. The course will include additional units of study to prepare students for the Advanced Placement course.

Physical Science

Students will spend the first semester of Physical Science studying physics and will examine motion, optics, magnetism, thermodynamics, and waves. The second semester will focus on the chemical properties of matter. Students will have the opportunity to apply the physical science principles they learn to the physics behind how rockets work.

Chemistry with Lab

The aim of this laboratory-based course is to give students an understanding and appreciation of all aspects of chemistry and allow them to feel confident in the application of this knowledge. It is the instructor’s hope that students will become self-directed learners with highly developed critical thinking skills. This college preparatory course will enable students to have a smooth transition into any university system.

Accelerated Chemistry with Lab

The Accelerated Chemistry course moves at a faster pace and covers topics in greater depth than the regular Chemistry course. It is the ideal preparation for Advanced Placement Chemistry.

Physics

Physics explores the interrelationship between energy and matter. It is a science that seeks to explain the natural phenomena surrounding every aspect of our lives. Physics is the study of the physical world. Human theories are refined by comparing predictions to observations and experimental evidence. Physics is learned through measurement, experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving. Mathematics is therefore the language of Physics! The thinking skills students develop in this class will be applicable to all aspects of their education and life, and in essence, are more important than the Physics itself!

Accelerated Physics

Accelerated Physics explores the interrelationship between energy and matter. This course covers the same material as Physics, but also includes angular kinematics, fluids, thermodynamics, and an introduction to modern physics. Accelerated Physics is intended as a preparatory course for AP Physics. Human theories are refined by comparing predictions to observations and experimental evidence. Physics is learned through measurement, experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving. Mathematics is therefore the language of Physics! The thinking skills you develop in this class will be applicable to all aspects of your education and life, and in essence, are more important than the Physics itself!

Anatomy and Physiology

This course provides an introduction to anatomy and physiology. Students will gain a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the eleven major organ systems of the body. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to complete basic dissections of mammalian organs to understand the structure of these organs. This class does contain significant memorization, so students should be prepared to spend time outside of class learning anatomical and physiological terms.

Genetics and Forensic Science

Forensic science is a course designed to introduce students to the application of science to the criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in the criminal justice system. Students will have the opportunity to examine how forensic science encompasses all branches of science. Students will learn how to examine physical evidence found in a crime scene, examine DNA, question documents, examine prints, trace evidence and serology. This course will also include an in depth look into the genetics used in crime scene investigation.

Organic and Biochemistry

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fields of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The importance of organic chemistry in the world today cannot be overstated. Students will learn that they are surrounded by organic molecules and reactions: foods, artificial flavors, perfumes, plastics, clothes, pharmaceutical drugs, biological molecules and processes, etc. This college preparatory course will enable students to have a smooth transition into any university organic chemistry course. College students in chemistry, biology, and pre-medical programs are generally required to take at least one year of organic chemistry, and they often find organic chemistry to be one of the most difficult courses they take in college. The knowledge gained in this introductory course at Holy Spirit Prep will enable students to feel comfortable and confident in their college organic course. This course is therefore recommended for any student that might be interested in pursuing these areas in college. The difficulty of the course is similar to the difficulty of the Accelerated Chemistry course.

AP Biology with Lab
2013 Exam
Averages
HSP  Georgia USA World
3.33 2.78 2.88 2.88

The aim of this laboratory-based course is to provide students with the experience of college level biology by taking a more in-depth look into the world of biology. Students will be reinforcing and expanding on topics introduced in first year biology. The course will leave students prepared to take the AP Biology exam. Student must be willing to make the extra time and commitment outside of class that is necessary to be successful in this class. Students should be prepared to read every night. There will be a lunch and Saturday study sessions necessary to complete all of the required labs and material required for success on the AP exam.

AP Chemistry with Lab
2013 Exam
Averages
Unavailable

The aim of this laboratory-based course is to provide students with the experience of college level chemistry by gaining a more indepth knowledge of the various aspects of the discipline. Students will be reinforcing and building on topics introduced in first year chemistry, with a particular emphasis on mathematical calculations associated with chemical concepts. The course will leave students prepared to take on the challenges of the AP® Chemistry exam and college science classes. In order for students to be successful, they will be required to make the extra time commitment necessary for practicing problems, studying, and preparing lab reports.

JV and Varsity Athletics

Students may earn course credit by participation in HSP's JV and Varsity athletics program. For a complete listing of our athletic programs, please visit our Athletics Program Information page.